Month: January 2016

Etiquette (2)

Most newcomers to bowls don’t realise how much of a team game it is. In fact, just as in other team sports you can see examples of a good team of average players beating a collection of individuals who may be better on a one-to-one basis but who just don’t gel as a unit.  Communication is vital in all this, plus the awareness of roles I’ve mentioned before.  Let’s have a look at how this works out in practice.

I’ve already said that only one person in the team should be giving instructions at any one time.  But this  doesn’t mean that everyone has to remain silent.  On the contrary, it’s really exhilarating when you’re in a team that’s encouraging one another after good shots – or even poor ones.  Generally, as the standard of play improves up to county and international level, so the level of noise increases as well.  This noise factor can be quite intimidating, and I’ve often seen a team of quiet, reserved players shrink further and further into their shells as a team of extroverts high-five their way down the rink simply because someone has got a bowl within two feet of the jack.  This was always a problem in the North-east of Scotland, where people are very reserved, especially when we played teams from the Central Belt, where the culture is much more open and noisy – it felt like we were three or four points down before the match had even started.

So by all means join in some applause or encouragement for team mates. What you should never, ever do is applaud a fluke shot by your own team, or a piece of bad luck for the opponents. There’s an element of luck involved in bowls – we all know and accept that – but when one of your team plays a bowl that is hopelessly wide and going nowhere, before it hits another hopeless bowl and deflects in to end up as shot, just please don’t applaud or say “Good shot”.  It’s guaranteed to wind the opposition up in reverse, and it doesn’t show much knowledge of the game.  Treat it more in the way that tennis players acknowledge a lucky net cord, and whether or not you actually apologise, you could say something like “Well, they all count, I suppose”. Most people will then just laugh it off.

The other irritating thing that some people do is to verbalise their hope that things will go wrong for the opposition.  For example, the opposition have one bowl in the head and their skip plays a shot that looks to be too heavy and is coming towards his own bowl.  Clearly if that one is moved you’ll pick up several shots.  Well, of course, this is the very shot your own skip might have played, but don’t whatever you do shout or even mutter “Come on, take it out!”.  Not unless you deliberately want to antagonise folk, of course.

Chalking the jack also has a relevance here.  Of course, it’s the responsibility of the team gaining a “toucher” to ensure that it is chalked, but you’ll see that it’s often the opposition skip or third who does this.  I interpret this as a sort of statement of honesty, whereby the person is very neatly expressing something to the effect of: “Ok, so I know that if this isn’t chalked and ends up in the ditch I could claim that it doesn’t count because it’s got no mark on it.  So just to prove what a good sport I am I’ll chalk it for you.”  Of course, the opposing player who’s benefited from the gesture should now say “Thank you”, “Cheers” or whatever passes for gratitude in their part of the world.

Other habits will also depend on the local environment.  At the indoor club where I play, for instance, there is a general convention that if one team is running away with victory they stop putting up the score on the scoreboard once they have passed about 20 shots – in other words, there’s no point in humiliating other club members.  (In a match between clubs, of course, this wouldn’t apply because everyone has to know what’s going on, especially when the match is based on aggregate scores over several rinks.)  But some people I know – quite mild and reasonable people, I should add – dismiss this idea of going easy on the opposition, and quite relish seeing a score like 36-3.   Just be aware of the conventions, wherever you are, and if you’re new to the game, or to a certain area, be ready to adjust.

After all these unpredictable events the end is finally completed and there has to be agreement on the number of shots.  The general rule here (and I mean, a rule of thumb as opposed to a rule of the sport) is that shots are conceded, as opposed to claimed.  So if you or your team have won the end you wait until your opposite number says how many shots (s)he is giving you.  You may think it should be one or even two more, in which case you can ask them to have another look, or to use a measure.  As you get more experience you’ll see things better and be more confident, but always remember that either through bias or bad eyesight the other person may be mistaken, so don’t be fobbed off.

The main point about conceding shots is that it is for the player on the side losing the end to remove bowls.  It looks bad (unless for some reason the players have come to another agreement) for the person winning the end to start picking up bowls or putting them to one side.

Technically, then, shots are conceded, but in reality, and especially in the men’s game, you’ll hear the side winning the end say  something like “Two?” (the implied question mark is important) to indicate what everyone can already see. It would waste time to go through some formal concession process.   There is a much greater edge and aggression when someone says something like “I’m looking for two.”  This rather invites some sarcastic rejoinder and the atmosphere can sour, so try to keep this bit of the game as light as possible.  Remember: “enjoy the game”!

 

 

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Etiquette (1)

The word “etiquette” might conjure images of people being very dainty and polite, but in the context of our blog it’s simply a general word to describe the things that players should (and shouldn’t) do and say in the course of a match.

Take, for instance, the start of the game.  You’ll notice that people always shake hands with every other player, exchanging some comment such as “Good game”, “Nice game”, or “Enjoy your game”.  This really is important, and so is the rounding-off at the end of the match.  Apart from the obvious “Well played” or “Thank you”, if it’s a knock-out match and you’ve finished on the losing side it’s a convention to wish the opponents good luck in the next round. This may be hard to make out sometimes as you are saying it through gritted teeth, but it has to be done. Come on, it’s only a game (a saying that is particularly favoured, for some reason, by those who’ve just lost!)

With regard to how to behave during actual play, just remember that possession really is nine tenths of the law in bowls.  More precisely, possession of the mat is the term used to indicate that you’re either in position to bowl or have just done so. In fact, you have possession of the mat once your opponent’s previous bowl has stopped, and at that point you are entitled to be on the mat, unimpeded.  There’s no need to rush – take your own time and play at your own rhythm. But by the same token, once your bowl has come to a stop at the other end you have to vacate the mat area. Don’t be surprised if you’re told to move if you stray up the green or stand admiringly on the mat.

You will sometimes see some players run, jog, or walk extremely fast after their bowl, in order to get to the other end.  (This is possible outdoors and in non-timed matches indoors, but as most indoor stadiums operate on the basis of timed sessions for matches there is usually a rule to ban such expeditions.)  In matches where it is allowed, remember that the rule is still that you mustn’t delay the next bowl, so you really have to arrive at the head no later than your bowl.  Sometimes players are a bit slow and it’s… well, it’s naughty.

Another thing that people sometimes get away with and shouldn’t do, is to ask questions about the outcome of their bowl immediately after it stops.  You really mustn’t do that.  As I explained above, possession has now passed to the other player or team, and any information which you want has to be asked after their next bowl.

Talking about exchanging information, remember that as the thirds and/or skips walk up the green and cross over in the middle of the end, the person who is about to play is the one who is in possession of the mat, and therefore can dictate the speed of the game.  If he wants to get on with it he must be able to do so, and not have to look at a group of opponents discussing possible strategy or bemoaning the dreadful luck they had on the last end. However, if the player due to bowl chooses to hang around and discuss options before heading off towards the mat that’s his prerogative, and the other side just has to wait. (Again, if there’s a time limit on the match you can expect some complaints if there’s any perceived time-wasting here.)

When you’re standing near the head either before or after bowling your own woods, it’s really vital to keep quiet and still when other people are bowling.  It can be incredibly irritating when you are about to bowl and someone decides to shift position for a better view, or to check the scoreboard.  Let me put my hand up and admit that I’ve been told off for moving in this way (the game was just sooo exciting, honest!) but at least I haven’t been a repeat offender.

The Laws make it clear that players who are at the non-bowling end must be behind the jack when someone is bowling (except that it is possible to step in front of the head to show a team member what shot to play). In addition to being behind the jack, if it isn’t one of your team who is bowling you should stay clear of the head as well.

Many of the little “rules” or conventions of bowls are just like those in other sports. For example, one avoids standing in a position where a shadow falls over the jack or right in front of the mat.  This would clearly make life difficult for the person bowling, and is akin to similar conventions in golf.  Another issue concerns the wearing of white shoes when using a white jack: if someone stands too close to the jack it can smudge the perspective from the other end, and the person bowling has every right to (politely) ask the player in question to move to one side. Meanwhile, when standing near the mat it’s important to stay well back behind the person bowling (the Laws stipulate one metre, minimum): it can be very off-putting to be aware of someone near your shoulder, or to catch a glimpse of someone in the corner of your eye just as you are lining up a shot.

These latter points may sound obvious, and they are certainly common sense, but it’s surprising how often they crop up (or would do if we hadn’t learned from previous experience).  One of the main reasons for this blog is to highlight and illustrate such issues so that you don’t have to learn the hard way, with the embarrassment that comes with it.  Most of this post has concerned what happens as players set up to bowl; in the next one I’ll look at some of the things that happen as the end develops.